Lazy Bear

Lazy Bear 008

3/4 oz Smith and Cross rum
3/4 oz rye whiskey
3/4 oz honey syrup (1:1 honey and water)
3/4 oz lime juice
2 dashes Fee’s Whiskey Barrel-Aged Bitters

Shake with ice and strain into an ice-filled rocks glass.

If the Fee’s bitters are unavailable, a good substitute is three dashes of spiced bitters, made by combining equal parts Angostura bitters and allspice dram.

I created this cocktail for the wedding of my friends David and Jeanette, who run the underground restaurant Lazy Bear in San Francisco.

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Shift Drink

Shift Drink

1 1/2 oz rye whiskey
3/4 oz ginger syrup
3/4 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz Fernet-Branca
lemon peel, for garnish

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Express the lemon peel over the drink, then discard. (The photo shows the peel in the drink, but it looks better without.)

To make the ginger syrup, simmer a few inches of ginger, sliced, with a cup each of sugar and water until flavorful. Strain into a bottle and keep refrigerated.

This drink has been a bestseller on my cocktail menus at Carlyle and Metrovino.

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Midnight Shift

Midnight Shift cocktail on my rooftop.

1 1/2 oz Novo Fogo Barrel Aged Cacha├ža
3/4 oz Cynar
3/4 oz sweet vermouth
1/4 oz Galliano L’Autentico
2 dashes mole bitters
1 dash absinthe
orange peel, for garnish

Give all the ingredients a good long stir with ice and strain onto a big frozen cube, if you have one handy. Otherwise serve it on your normal rocks. And don’t omit the orange peel. Like Jeff Lebowski’s rug, the citrus oil really ties everything together.

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Black Glove

black-glove

2 oz aged rum (Gosling’s Black Seal)
1 oz sweet vermouth (Dolin)
1/2 oz nocino (Nux Alpina)
1 dash Angostura bitters
1/2 preserved walnut, for garnish
orange peel, for garnish

Stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass, and garnish with orange peel and preserved green walnut. You can buy the walnuts from Harvest Song here.

This is a version of a cocktail from the Metrovino menu that I adapted for use with commercially available ingredients for a Wall Street Journal article about unusual garnishes. The original drink uses our house nocino, which is spicier than those I find in stores. Though not really replicable, here’s our house recipe for the Black Glove:

1 1/2 oz Cruzan Black Strap rum
1 oz Dolin sweet vermouth
1/2 oz house Nocino

Stir with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass, and garnish with orange peel and preserved green walnut.

[Photo by F. Martin Ramin for The Wall Street Journal, styling by Anne Cardenas.]

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Resplendent Island

New cocktail at Metrovino: Margarita flavored with Sri Lankan curry and honey, cumin-salt rim.

1 1/2 oz reposado tequila
3/4 oz Sri Lankan curry-honey syrup
3/4 oz lime juice
1/4 oz Royal Combier
salt and ground cumin, for garnish

Moisten half the rim of a rocks glass with lime juice and coat with the salt and cumin mixture, then fill with ice. Shake cocktail ingredients with ice and strain into the glass.

About that curry blend: It’s the roasted curry powder from Rice and Curry: Sri Lankan Home Cooking by Skiz Fernando, Jr., a very interesting cookbook a friend sent me recently. Rather than copy that recipe here, I’d rather encourage you to support the author by buying the book or purchasing his blend directly, which you can do here. It requires a few hard to find ingredients like curry leaves and a dozen spices, so buying the blend is the easier approach. I recommend the book though and have enjoyed the wonderfully flavored curries I’ve made from it.

2 tablespoons roasted curry powder
1 cup honey
1 cup water

Simmer all ingredients for a few minutes until flavorful, then add a pinch of salt. Cool, strain, and bottle.

If Royal Combier is unavailable, other cognac-based orange liqueurs would likely make fine substitutes.

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Robin Egg

Vaccari Nero, finally available in Oregon. Make it blue!

1 1/2 oz Vaccari Nero
1 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz Bols Genever
1/2 oz simple syrup
1/2 oz cream
1 egg white
soda
coffee bean, for garnish

Add the sambuca, lemon, genever, simple syrup, cream, and egg white to a shaker. Dry shake to aerate, then add ice and shake again. Give it a good, long, hard shake. Strain into a glass, preferably a champagne flute if you have a tall one. Let the foam settle and top with soda. Finish by grating a bit of coffee bean on top, a nod to the traditional “con mosca” way of serving sambuca.

This recipe comes courtesy of Southern California barman Erik Trickett. Get the background here.

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Hot Buttered Chartreuse

Hot Buttered Chartreuse.

1 1/2 oz Chartreuse (green)
1 big dollop Hot Buttered Rum batter, to taste
hot water

Add the batter and some of the hot water to a mug, stirring to dissolve. Then add the Chartreuse and top off with more hot water, giving everything one final stir to combine.

About that dollop: This is no time for moderation. You left moderation behind the moment you decided to drink butter and Chartreuse. Compensate later if you have to, but get the most of out of this experience and don’t hold back on the batter.

About the mug: Be sure to pre-heat it. The mug, the batter, and the spirit are going to lower the temperature of the water. The drink is Hot Buttered Chartreuse, not Tepid Buttered Chartreuse. A mug pre-heated with hot water will keep your drink warmer longer.

For more background on this recipe, see my original blog post.

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