Thyme in a Bottle

Thyme in a Bottle

1 oz gin
3/4 oz Farigoule thyme liqueur
3/4 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz maraschino liqueur
thyme sprig, for garnish

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a thyme sprig. A nice touch is to place the thyme over a candle while making the drink, warming it up to release its aroma.

This is a Last Word variation using Farigoule in place of Chartreuse. Tips of the hat to Charles Munat for the idea and to my dad for the name.

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New Amsterdam Sour

New Amsterdam Sour

1 1/2 oz Bols Genever
3/4 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz simple syrup (1:1 sugar and water)
red wine

Shake the genever, lemon juice, and simple syrup with ice and strain into an ice-filled rocks glass. Insert straw and float approximately half an ounce of red wine on top. Using crushed ice to fill the glass is a nice touch but not strictly necessary.

This is a variation on the New York Sour, with genever offering some nice botanicals and a more striking visual contrast than rye does. It was created for a party at Metrovino attended by Washington wine makers.

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Shift Drink

Shift Drink

1 1/2 oz rye whiskey
3/4 oz ginger syrup
3/4 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz Fernet-Branca
lemon peel, for garnish

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Express the lemon peel over the drink, then discard. (The photo shows the peel in the drink, but it looks better without.)

To make the ginger syrup, simmer a few inches of ginger, sliced, with a cup each of sugar and water until flavorful. Strain into a bottle and keep refrigerated.

This drink has been a bestseller on my cocktail menus at Carlyle and Metrovino.

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Robin Egg

Vaccari Nero, finally available in Oregon. Make it blue!

1 1/2 oz Vaccari Nero
1 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz Bols Genever
1/2 oz simple syrup
1/2 oz cream
1 egg white
soda
coffee bean, for garnish

Add the sambuca, lemon, genever, simple syrup, cream, and egg white to a shaker. Dry shake to aerate, then add ice and shake again. Give it a good, long, hard shake. Strain into a glass, preferably a champagne flute if you have a tall one. Let the foam settle and top with soda. Finish by grating a bit of coffee bean on top, a nod to the traditional “con mosca” way of serving sambuca.

This recipe comes courtesy of Southern California barman Erik Trickett. Get the background here.

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