Quick Little Pick Me Up

Cocktail blogging has been slow here as I’m currently on break from working in bars and restaurants to focus on writing my beer cocktail book. It now has a publisher and will be coming out early next year from Stewart, Tabori, and Chang, with photography by the extremely talented David L. Reamer. We’ve completed about half the shots at this point and I can tell you already that the drinks are going to look fantastic.

That means I’m not doing much drink creation at the moment, but here’s one from a while back that I’ve been meaning to post. I got the idea of doing a coffee-infused amaro from Matthew Biancaniello in Los Angeles. I made an infusion of Stumptown Hairbender espresso beans and Ramazzotti amaro, then played around with it in several cocktails that I was never quite happy with. The infusion itself was delicious though, so I ended up just putting it on a big ice cube with a lemon twist. Sometimes easiest is best.

This drink started out on the Metrovino brunch menu, then migrated to the after dinner menu, and finally made it over to The Hop and Vine. I don’t think it’s available anywhere right now, but it’s simple to make at home.

8 oz Ramazzotti
10 grams coffee beans

Lightly muddle the coffee beans to crack (but not pulverize) them. Seal in a glass jar with Ramazzotti. Infuse for 24 hours, strain, and bottle. If you want to make more, just scale the recipe upward.

To serve, pour two ounces in a glass with a big rock and express a lemon peel over the drink. Garnish with the peel.

[Photo by Julia Raymond for The Hop and Vine.]

How grilling meat really is like a smoking a cigar

In his “Explainer” column at Slate yesterday, Brian Palmer raised alarm about grilled and smoked meats, suggesting that by eating them we may be, as the headline puts it, “Cooking Up Cancer”:

A growing body of research suggests that cooking meats over a flame is linked to cancer. Combusting wood, gas, or charcoal emits chemicals known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to these so-called PAHs is known to cause skin, liver, stomach, and several other types of cancer in lab animals. Epidemiological studies link occupational exposure to PAHs to cancer in humans. When PAHs from a flame mingle with nitrogen, say from a slab of meat, they can form nitrated PAHs, or NPAHs. NPAHs are even more carcinogenic than PAHs in laboratory experiments. The reasonable conclusion is that grilling meat may be hazardous to your health.

The evidence linking cancer to cooking meat over a combustion source has been accumulating for decades. Epidemiologists first noticed a connection between the consumption of smoked foods and stomach cancer in the 1960s. Japan, Russia, and Eastern Europe, where smoking is a popular way to preserve meat and fish, became laboratories for gastric cancer research. Newer studies suggest that eating smoked meats may lead to cancer even outside the gastrointestinal tract. A 2012 study, for example, linked smoked meat consumption with breast cancer.

Palmer then compares current attitudes toward grilled meats to outdated acceptance of tobacco use:

In the mid- to late-19th century, doctors determined that lip and tongue cancer rates were higher among smokers of pipes and cigars. Despite this link, major medical journals mocked those who opposed smoking. The Lancet, the leading journal of the time and still one of the most important medical journals in the world, wrote in 1879, “We have no sympathy with prejudices against … tobacco, used under proper restriction as to the time and amount of the consumption. … A cigar when the mood and the circumstances are propitious [is] not only to be tolerated, but approved.” Moderation, not abstinence, was the order of the day.

[...]

It wasn’t until 1964 that the Report of the Surgeon General finally and firmly declared that smoking was indisputably linked to the surge in lung cancer. By that time, epidemiologists had a complete picture of the long-term effects of the increase in cigarette smoking that began around the time of World War I. The conclusions practically drew themselves. Still, it took the public health community decades to agree that smoking in moderation is a terrible idea.

I learned of the article from my friend Jeff Woodhead on Twitter, who took Palmer to task for sensationalizing the dangers of grilling and noted that habitual cigarette use carries far greater risks than exposure to charred meat. I don’t disagree. However I want to defend Palmer on one point. He is actually correct to compare grilling meats to smoking tobacco, though not in the way he realizes.

That pack-a-day consumption of cigarettes greatly elevates one’s risk of lung cancer is no longer disputed by any sensible person. Moderate use of other forms of tobacco, in contrast, carries much less danger. The Lancet article that Palmer mocks for suggesting that moderation in tobacco use is nothing to worry about overstates the case but was not too far from the truth.

Just how dangerous is it to enjoy an occasional cigar “when the mood and the circumstances are propitious?” A study in Preventive Medicine compared rates of lung cancer among smokers of various kinds of tobacco to those of non-smokers. Cigarette smokers were 16 times more likely than never smokers to get lung cancer. Smokers of cigars only, pipes only, and cigars and pipes all fared much better. Further, lung cancer among pipe and cigar smokers was concentrated among those who were the heaviest consumers. “Among pipe and/or cigar smokers only, patients with lung cancer were more likely than controls to have been long-time smokers of 5 or more cigars or 5 or more pipefuls per day and to have inhaled. The odds ratio for those smoking 5 to 9 cigars or pipes per day was 3.2 and for those smoking 10 or more units 6.7. The odds ratio of those cigar or pipe smokers who inhaled was 12.3.”

A cohort study published in The New England Journal of Medicine followed about 17,000 men enrolled in Kaiser Permanente health plans who reported never smoking pipes or cigarettes. Over a course of more than 20 years, the study compared health outcomes for non-smokers and smokers of cigars. Cigar smokers carried a relative risk of cancer in the aerodigestive tract of 2.02 and in the lungs of 2.14.

A third study in BMJ examined the risks of dying from three smoking-related diseases among former cigarette smokers who had switched to smoking pipes or cigars. Their mortality risk relative to users of pipes and cigars who were never cigarette smokers was 1.51. To put that in perspective, their relative risk compared to people who had never smoked at all was 1.68. In other words, the study found that even former cigarette smokers who switch to pipes and cigars lowered their mortality risk to a level not much above that of never smokers.

Brad Rodu, an advocate of harm reduction approaches in tobacco control, summarizes many of these risks. What it basically comes do is this: Cigarettes are uniquely dangerous because they are inhaled directly into the lungs and are very addictive. Other forms of tobacco that are mainly enjoyed in the mouth and lend themselves less easily to habitual consumption are significantly less dangerous. The risks are real, but much, much lower than those associated with cigarettes.

How does all of this compare to eating meat? Palmer doesn’t cite many sources that specify the dangers, but one study he links to does associate consumption of smoked meat with breast cancer. It finds an adjusted odds ratio of 2.31-3.13. If that’s accurate (and it may be on the high side), then eating lots of grilled meat may actually be a lot like enjoying an occasional cigar — which is to say that it’s a reasonable choice many adults may decide to make.

(Note: Some of the studies cited in this post use relative risk while others use odds ratios. These are not identical measures but should be roughly comparable.)

It’s also interesting to ask how this compares to the dangers of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke. Smoking bans have proliferated on the justification that workers should not be put at risk. Whatever one’s opinion of these policies, consider the findings from the landmark 2006 report from the Surgeon General. The report concludes without equivocation that environmental tobacco smoke increases the risk of lung cancer in non-smokers. By how much? The reports’ table of meta-analyses of studies estimates relative risks of exposure at home for non-smoking spouses or at work for non-smoking employees in a range of 1.12 at the low end to 1.43 on the high end. Those are low relative risks! If they are enough to justify comprehensive bans on indoor smoking — not to mention the outdooor bans that are now so popular — then one may well question the ethics of allowing restaurant cooks to expose themselves to grill smoke on our behalf.

One of the big problems with reporting on cancer is that it focuses on the wrong question. Journalists ask, “Does X increase the risk of cancer?” The answer is very often yes, but they don’t follow-up with, “By how much?” Lifestyle choices carry trade-offs and better reporting would help readers put them into perspective. Palmer, to his credit, does write that the “risk-reward equation for smoking differs from that of grilling or frying meat” and acknowledges that the epidemiology on the latter is not yet clearly established. His mistake is to carelessly lump all forms of tobacco use into one, ignoring the fact that different types and different use patterns carry substantially different levels of risk.

Of course, few yet advocate completely giving up grilled or smoked meat, much less passing legislation to restrict it. “Everything in moderation,” said one of the toxicologists quoted in the Slate article. One assumes that the toxicologist’s definition of “everything” doesn’t include tobacco, because who would say that these days? But Palmer’s comparison of grilling to smoking isn’t crazy. It just tells us a lot more about contemporary bias against tobacco use than it does about the dangers of meat.

Tour Portland by Bitcoin

Depending on whom one asks, Bitcoin is the future of currency, a useful tool for conducting transactions with vast untapped potential, or a speculative bubble of no lasting consequence. Enthusiasm for Bitcoin also signals various commitments, as Tyler Cowen notes, such as for libertarianism and technological optimism. Bitcoin has had a big week, with Overstock.com agreeing to accept it and The Chicago Sun-Times trying out a Bitcoin paywall.

The less obvious uses of Bitcoin are also intriguing. Writing at the Umlaut, Eli Dourado explains how the programming language that makes Bitcoin work opens up all kinds of possibilities, including contracts, micropayments, and proof of identity. It’s enough to convince me that Bitcoin or a successor cryptocurrency will likely be increasingly relevant and that it’s worth getting familiar with how to use it. And though I’ve in all likelihood missed my chance to strike it rich, there are far worse gambles than speculating on Bitcoin from my living room. It’s cheaper than Vegas and the drinks are better.

But if one is holding on to bitcoins for any reason beyond speculation, one will eventually want to spend them. There are lots of ways to do this online. Transfers between friends are also easy. But what about a night on the town? Where can one go to, say, turn bitcoins into beer?

To find out, my friend Tom and I consulted CoinMap.org to plot an evening out in Portland exclusively patronizing businesses that accept Bitcoin. As one might expect, it gets a little weird.

Sadly, we weren’t able to experience what likely would have been the weirdest stop on our itinerary. At Float On in southeast Portland, customers exchange dollars or bitcoins for 90-minute sessions in a sensory deprivation chamber, floating in complete darkness and silence. Float On’s FAQ promises that floaters will not drown, that it’s not New Age mumbo-jumbo, and that “only a small percentage of floaters turn into proto-human monkeys.”

Would I hallucinate a UFO abduction, be inspired to take up impressionist painting, or perhaps receive a vision of Bitcoin’s future value? I didn’t get to find out. Float On was booked until 2 am the night of our adventure, which was a little later than we were willing to commit to. The business closed for renovations the following day, promising to re-open in February. I was looking forward to this, but it will have to wait for some other time. I suppose it’s good to know for future reference that if one craves sensory deprivation at two in the morning, there’s a place in Portland to find it.

Our first stop instead was browsing the Mirador home goods store on southeast Division street, which was pleasant, if not quite as mind-expanding as a plunge into sensory deprivation. The store offers everything from standard pots and pans to more Portlandian items like home cheese-making kits. Tom picked out a cutting board and a cocktail strainer, and I made my first Bitcoin purchase, a small brush for cleaning out metal straws. I’d been needing one of those!

The checkout process at Mirador was the smoothest of all the places we visited. The clerk rang up our orders, then used a computer to generate a QR code containing a unique Bitcoin wallet address and the total price of our purchase. We simply held our phones up to the screen, approved the transfer, and the transaction was completed within seconds.

Our next stop was just two blocks away at Papa G’s vegan organic deli, which offers dishes such as a tofu dog, tempeh reuben, and house “nochos.” While the aromas at Papa G’s were enticing, we were not its target demographic and spent a while mulling our options. Eventually we settled on a couple of their house made drinks, a hibiscus cooler and ginger beer kefir. These were both good and refreshing. For those seeking harder stuff, the deli also offers a selection of bottled beers.

Checkout was completed by scanning a QR code taped to the register that is linked to a Bitcoin wallet controlled by the owner. This was fast and easy, but leaves the staff without a direct way of verifying the transaction.

A few minutes north is Madison’s Grill, a place I’d passed by many times but never visited until last week. Madison’s began accepting Bitcoin at the urging of local enthusiasts and hosts the Portland area Bitcoin Meetup group. The menu offers standard pub fare like burgers and fish and chips, and the fourteen-handle tap list includes both familiar brands and a rotating selection of craft beers, among them Awesome Ales and No-Li on our visit. This is easily the best place to convert bitcoins into beer in Portland. Given the rise in Bitcoin’s value from when I first bought in a few days before, my beer was essentially free.

We ended up sitting next to the owner, Steve Brown, an outgoing guy who’s having fun with his experiment being the first full-service bar and restaurant in Portland to accept Bitcoin. Though not yet a huge part of his business, the venture does seem to be paying off with new customers and press.

Madison’s is also notable for being the only place on our crawl that has found a way to integrate tips into their Bitcoin transactions. These are recorded by wait staff and factored into their paperwork at the end of the night, much like a credit card tip.

No tour of Portland is complete without a visit to food carts, so our next stop was Whiffies Fried Pies in the pod at southeast 12th and Hawthorne, just one block away from Madison’s. Whiffies makes sweet and savory fried handpies that I’ve enjoyed many times in the past. Tom and I both opted for the BBQ brisket and mozzarella pie, which came out steaming hot and delicious. This is my pick for the best place to trade bitcoins for food in Portland.

Just like at Papa G’s, checkout here was completed by scanning a QR code linked to the owner’s account.

Along with its coffee shops, breweries, and food carts, Portland’s hospitality industry is famous for its strip clubs. Out of town guests make a point to visit them, the local alt-weekly reviews their steak offerings, and the likes of Tyler Cowen and Josh Barro comment on their economic strategies. While there are plenty of sleazy ones, others feel like good dive bars that just happen to have naked women in them. It’s a strange dynamic, perhaps best summed up like this: In other cities, you go to the strip club and don’t tell your wife. In Portland, your wife invites you.

Thorough research demanded that we conclude our evening at the Kit Kat Club, a new bar that claims to be the first strip club to accept Bitcoin. (This is only the second nerdiest reason I’ve gone to a strip club, the first being the time I went to the Boom Boom Room to see magician Reed McClintock perform card tricks.)

Implausible as the idea seemed, we hoped that this might mean that one could tip performers in Bitcoin, perhaps through creative use of tattoos and QR codes. Alas, that isn’t the case, and for obvious reasons they don’t want customers using phones that could just as easily be recording video as transferring currency. That aspect of the business remains a cash affair. (That said, it seems that an enterprising, tech-savvy dancer could set herself up to accept Bitcoin individually. Paging Lynsie Lee.)

The bar incorporates aspects of cabaret, with an emcee and themed performances, but it’s still very much a strip club. The staff was fun and friendly. Stumptown Dumplings offers food; their pork dumplings with chili hoisin were pretty good, though they require a separate non-Bitcoin transaction. My only knock against the place would be the beer selection, which is bottle-only and dominated by mass market lagers. Is there much of an overlap between people who spend bitcoins and people who go to strip clubs? I have no idea, but if there is, Kit Kat is the club they’re looking for.

Below, a few assorted thoughts and observations from our Bitcoin crawl…

Ease of use: Getting set up with Bitcoin was easy. I signed up with CoinBase for my primary account, linked that to my checking account to purchase Bitcoin, and transferred Bitcoin to a Mycelium wallet on my cell phone to spend while we were out.

Integration: Though all of our transactions went smoothly, Bitcoin payments aren’t yet easily integrated into the point of sale systems of the places we visited. In some cases, the money was sent to an owner who wasn’t on the premises. Staff could potentially verify transactions by watching a customer’s phone screen, but this is hard to monitor closely. At Madison’s they asked for a name and phone number as back up. Right now people paying with Bitcoin are early adopters and trust is high, but better integration with POS systems would make bar and restaurant use of Bitcoin more secure.

Tipping: As mentioned above, Madison’s was the only one of the four bars and restaurants we visited that factored tipping into their accounts. At every other stop we needed cash for tipping staff, making it impractical to spend a night out using only Bitcoin. (However if a restaurant wanted to switch to a percentage service charge model, that would be easier to handle.)

Privacy: I think that only one of the businesses we patronized generated a unique address for each Bitcoin transaction. Since the blockchain documenting Bitcoin transactions is public, anyone who knows the address used by a business can see how much money it has received. Right now this is a small enough part of their volume to be of little concern, but if Bitcoin becomes more popular one can imagine that they may not want to broadcast their sales so easily.

Volatility: It should go without saying that the volatility of Bitcoin prices is a concern for businesses to consider. Right now, I doubt many local businesses would have any trouble converting their Bitcoin receipts to dollars if they don’t want to carry a large balance. On the other hand, if they’re optimistic about Bitcoin’s future value, they may want to hold on to them.

New customers: Perhaps the best reason to start accepting Bitcoin now is to attract new customers. There are people who want to spend bitcoins and they currently have few options for where to do so. There is a benefit to being one of the first in an industry to accept the currency, both for being discovered by new clients and for getting press coverage. Even if one is skeptical of Bitcoin and rapidly converts all sales to dollars, it could be worthwhile to get on board before competitors do.

Advantages over credit cards: Credit card transactions take time to post, they can be reversed if a customer protests, and the associated fees are significant. Standard Bitcoin transactions are fast, irreversible, and cheap. (It is possible to structure Bitcoin transactions so that they can be arbitrated and reversed, but getting a refund for a standard exchange requires the retailer’s consent.) I doubt Bitcoin will replace Visa anytime soon, but these are advantages for a small business to consider.

One additional way restaurants might use Bitcoin is to hold reservations. Popular restaurants lose revenue when a reserved table sits empty. Even if a restaurant takes a credit card number to charge in the case of a no-show, it’s possible that the customer will contest the payment. Restaurants could instead require a deposit of Bitcoin to hold a table and then either return it when the party arrives or deduct an equivalent amount from the bill.

Taxation: Perhaps the biggest disadvantage to accepting Bitcoin is figuring out how to factor it into one’s taxes. This seems to be a gray area at the moment and could get complicated.

Bottom line: There’s a lot of room for expansion when it comes to accepting Bitcoin. Integrating it into one’s business will probably get easier over time, but there are also advantages to being among the first to try it out.

Spirit of Sri Lanka: Coconut arrack

My trip to Sri Lanka was primarily dedicated to tea, but along the way we made a point to explore as many aspects of the local drinks culture as possible. For distilled spirits, that meant coconut arrack, the country’s signature and most popular spirit.

To prevent confusion, it’s best to start with what coconut arrack is not. It’s not Batavia arrack, the Indonesian spirit distilled from sugar cane and red rice. It’s also not Mediterranean arak or raki, the anise-flavored liqueur. Though these spirits may share a common etymology, the similarities end there. The tastes and methods of production are completely different, and they’re not substitutes for each other.

Sri Lankan coconut arrack is distilled from nectar drawn from coconut flowers, collected by “toddy tappers.” This nectar rapidly ferments into a low-alcohol beverage called toddy. Sadly I did not have an opportunity to try this, but it’s photographed below.

The fermented toddy is distilled and aged in barrels of oak or halmilla, an indigenous tree species. After ageing it’s bottled and sold in the ubiquitous “wine shops,” which purvey all kinds of alcoholic beverages.

In every example that I encountered, spirits were purchased by walking up to a window display and ordering from a cashier who retrieves the requested bottles and completes the transaction. Even if the alcohol counter was within another store, it was completely cordoned off. I’m guessing this is a legal requirement. Regardless, outside of the airport duty free store I didn’t come across any place where one could freely roam the shelves.

The shop windows range from utilitarian…

… to more upscale.

As seen above, a lot of the big global brands are here. There’s also a variety of coconut arrack to choose from. The cheapest of these can be had for about three US dollars per 375 ml bottle. At the higher end, I found an offering from Mendis with an eighteen year age statement that sold for about $35 for 700 ml. In total, I sampled about eight different bottlings of coconut arrack, and brought four home with me.

One word of advice about buying arrack in Sri Lanka: Read the fine print! One of the bottles I picked up was awful. So awful, in fact, that not even a bus of bartenders would drink it. A glance at the label revealed the reason. Just as there are mixto tequilas that blend agave with neutral spirits, there are coconut arracks that do the same with neutral spirits and distilled toddy. But whereas mixto tequilas require at least 51% of the spirit to come from agave, the percentage of coconut spirits in some arracks is as low as 3%. The ones I tried have nothing but price to recommend them.

The pure arracks, though, can be quite nice. They strike me as most comparable to rum, though with a distinctive floral note and brightness. Barrel ageing contributes hints of vanilla and smooths out the spirit.

Fortunately, one no longer has to go all the way to Sri Lanka to try it. White Lion VSOA is now available in the United States, produced by Distilleries Company of Sri Lanka. The VSOA stands for “Very Special Old Arrack,” an abbreviation used to comply with American labeling regulations regarding the word “arrack.” It’s definitely among the best I’ve tried and worth seeking out for a unique addition to one’s bar. (White Lion also provided the toddy photos above.)

One more word of advice when shopping for alcohol in Sri Lanka: Keep an eye on the sky. Poya, which fall about every thirty days and follow the lunar calendar, are religious holidays. If there’s a full Moon, the sale of alcohol is forbidden. Even in hotel bars catering to tourists, you will be greeted with a sign like the one above. Fortunately our hosts warned us of this the day before, and our bus of thirsty bartenders was well rationed with local beers and arrack.

Speaking of beer, the one above was my favorite of the ones I tried in Sri Lanka. Most of the beers sold here are refreshing lagers, but this was a full-bodied stout. Was I man enough to deserve it? Maybe not, but I enjoyed it anyway.

By this time in our trip we’d made it well up into the hill country to Nuwara Eliya, once known as “Little England” for its popularity with the British. I understand the appeal. Up here the weather is comfortably temperate compared to the heat and humidity along the coast. It’s no wonder the British moved inland and upward, bringing colonial architecture, a golf course, and billiard rooms with them. Visiting the Grand Hotel is like stepping back in time a hundred years, with wi-fi.

Indidentally, I wonder now if the American drinks writer Charles Baker stayed in the same hotel. In the foreword to Jigger, Beaker, and Glass, he mentions spending “two days in Newara Eyliya, hill station back of Colombo, Ceylon, to get our breath.” On that same adventure he also went to visit a friend at Galle Face…

“… where we swam in the blood-warm Indian Ocean and drank enough of his Flying Fish cocktails to do, and lay on the cool sand and listened to Tauber sing Dein Ist Mein Ganzes Herz on the gramophone. Then when we swam again we slipped out of our suits to make the water feel better, and finally, when it was very late indeed, we dressed and said goodnight and vowed eternal friendship to our host; then for precisely no reason at all dismissed our waiting carriage with a flourish of gross overpayment and walked all the way back in our evening clothes through a new quiet rain to the jetties and the motor launch, just in time to prevent one of our best American cruising friends from consummating bribery of of the Quartermaster of the good ship RESOLUTE into letting him hoist a purchased baby girl elephant — whom he said was Edith, and over whom he politely held a Burmese parasol of scarlet oiled silk — from a hired barge onto the forward hatch in a sling!”

And, well, you get the picture.

The Grand Hotel is home to one of Dilmah’s T Bars, cafes in which one can order a nearly full range of Dilmah teas. Whether coming down to it for tea in the morning or sitting outside late into the night with a hookah, I loved this place.

On our final night here, we each gave a presentation on various ways to incorporate tea into cocktails. For my own, I opted to go with a riff on classic punch technique, which often uses tea instead of water to dilute the strength of the higher proof ingredients. Given how much coconut arrack I was hauling around with me, I wanted to use that too.

Teamaker’s Punch
500 ml Dilmah green tea
100 g palm sugar
7 oz lemon juice
6 oz Damrak gin
3 oz White Lion coconut arrack
cinnamon
nutmeg

Brew the tea and then pour it hot into a punch bowl with the palm sugar. Using a muddler, crush the sugar and stir until dissolved. Add the remaining ingredients, grate nutmeg and cinnamon atop the punch, and slip in an ice block or ladle into ice-filled punch glasses. (In Nuwara Eliya I used jaggery, but I’ve adapted the recipe to palm sugar, which I find more readily here.)

And, finally, remember not to let good punch go to waste.

[Photos that are not my own courtesy of Bols, Dilmah, and White Lion.]

2013 blog in review

“Sometime in the past few years, the blog died,” Jason Kottke wrote recently for Nieman Journalism Lab. “…[The] function of the blog, the nebulous informational task we all agreed the blog was fulfilling for the past decade, is increasingly being handled by a growing number of disparate media forms that are blog-like but also decidedly not blogs.”

Increasingly, the blog is where I write things that are too long for Twitter and too esoteric or personal for other publications. Use of the site as a means of sharing links is basically dead, replaced far more effectively by Twitter and Facebook.

My own blog didn’t die this year, but it was certainly wounded. For the first time in the ten years that I’ve been blogging, overall traffic dropped precipitously. In 2012, this site recorded 96,344 visits. In 2013, that number dropped to 74,616, a decline of 22%.

There’s no mystery as to where the missing traffic went. Surprisingly, traffic from nearly all sources is up. The one giant exception is search referrals from Google, down 66% from 2012. The total number of site visits dropped by about 21,000, but visits from Google alone dropped by nearly 30,000. I don’t know what I did to make the Google Gods angry, but that’s clearly something I need to work on.

One predictable result of this is that the infamous post about camel crickets is no longer the most viewed entry on the site. That honor now goes to the almost equally inane stapler post, thanks to a huge surge from Reddit. Two posts from 2013 cracked the top 10, one on tobacco policy and the other an April Fools’ post.

Top posts of 2013
1. The stapler’s secret
2. MxMo Redemption: Harvey Weissbanger
3. Camel crickets invade DC
4. My coffee smells like tuna fish
5. How to get rid of camel crickets
6. Defining “tobacco use” for cigar smokers
7. Using a jigger? You’re doing it wrong.
8. How to make coffee bitters
9. Mixing with the Mad Dog
10. Get sweet on liqueurs

As mentioned above, search was not the key driver of traffic this year. Here are the top twelve results (counting two extra because the top result being my name without a space in it seems fishy).

Top search referrals of 2013
1. jacobgrier
2. weird fish
3. jacob grier
4. coffee bitters
5. how to get rid of camel crickets
6. french vermouth
7. coffee bitters recipe
8. camel cricket
9. clarified lime juice
10. crickets
11. curse of scotland cocktail
12. what is the other side of the stapler for?

Though the order switched a bit, the list of countries visiting this site the most is completely unchanged over the past two years.

Top visitor countries from 2013
1. United States
2. Canada
3. United Kingdom
4. Australia
5. Germany
6. India
7. Netherlands
8. Sweden
9. France
10. Philippines

The city list is fairly similar too, with London the only international city cracking the top ten.

Top visitor cities from 2013
1. New York
2. Portland
3. Los Angeles
4. Chicago
5. Washington
6. Phoenix
7. London
8. San Francisco
9. Seattle
10. Boston

For the second year in a row, Reddit is the number one referrer of traffic to the site. Blogs have notably fallen off the list, with The Pegu Blog sneaking in at the ten spot. One interesting result: Referrals from the Facebook website dropped 26%, but this was partially offset by a 67% increase in referrals from Facebook mobile.

Top non-search referrers for 2013
1. Reddit
2. Buzzfeed
3. Facebook
4. Twitter
5. Gojee
6. Pinterest
7. Foodjournaling
8. StumbleUpon
9. Liqurious
10. The Pegu Blog

Late in 2012 I added a new section to the site devoted entirely to cocktail recipes, both for convenience of presentation and in hopes that it would be good for search engine optimization. That hasn’t quite worked out, with the section as a whole pulling in only 4,538 visits. Interestingly, the top two traffic cocktail posts were for ingredients instead of finished drinks.

Top cocktail recipes for 2013
1. Clarified Lime Juice
2. Apple Cider Gastrique
3. Clubland
4. Shift Drink
5. Cleared for Departure
6. Ethan Allen
7. Averna Stout Flip
8. Spiced Plantain Syrup
9. Aquavit Hot Toddy
10. Alto Cucina

There are still lots of good reasons to keep a blog, both as a repository of news and research and as a way of increasing my profile; I get a decent amount of consulting work as a result of having the site. And with the notable exception of Google, traffic from most sources continues to increase. I’ll be curious to see if the decline reverses in 2014.

When I started this site in 2003, blogging had cachet. Now, not so much. As Jason Kottke harshly puts it, “blogs are for 40-somethings with kids.” But there’s no point in stopping now. I embrace my role as an old man in internet years and will probably continue blogging long after the kids have moved onto HoloTumblrs.