Two new cigarettes, now authorized for sale

This week the FDA sent out a press release boasting that its Center for Tobacco Products has finally issued a few decisions on new tobacco products:

For the first time since the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 gave the U.S. Food and Drug Administration the authority to regulate tobacco products, the agency has authorized the marketing of two new tobacco products and denied the marketing of four others through the substantial equivalence (SE) pathway. [...]

“Today’s historic announcement marks an important step toward the FDA’s goal of reducing preventable disease and death caused by tobacco,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “The FDA has unprecedented responsibility to protect public health by not allowing new tobacco products under FDA’s authority to come to market without FDA review.”

To put this into context, when I wrote about the FDA in March the agency had received about 3,500 new product applications. The most reasonable interpretation of the law giving the agency authority over tobacco implies that these reviews should take only 90 days, and certainly no more than 180, yet some of these have languished in a bureaucratic quagmire for years. Issuing only six decisions since 2009, with more than 100 employees at work reviewing them, is hardly an accomplishment worthy of praise.

(If you’re wondering, Hestia Tobacco, the brand I profiled for The Atlantic, remains tied up in the review process with no end in sight.)

It’s also worth emphasizing what these approvals don’t mean. They don’t mean that these two new cigarettes are any safer than products already on the market, only that they don’t raise any new questions of health. In other words, they’re just as lethal — though no more so, we are told to believe — as other cigarettes. New cigarettes like Hestia, which by any sensible standard also raise no new questions of public health, continue to be blocked. It’s difficult to see what good is accomplished by requiring them to go through this lengthy approval process.

And in the midst of this, the future of e-cigarettes remains unclear. As I explained at The Umlaut this week, this product that is indisputably safer than real cigarettes may soon fall under the same heavy-handed regulation that has brought the tobacco industry to a standstill. If that happens, the FDA will have even less to brag about that it does today.

Comments

  1. Bill Godshall says:

    The most important SE application rulings announced by FDA were four SE applications that were rejected by the agency, the 20 SE applications the agency refused to accept, and the 136 SE applications that were withdrawn by the applicants.

    The agency cited a clause in the FSPTCA that prohibits them from disclosing information about SE applications.

    Hopefully, some of the aggrieved SE applicants will publicly expose the FDA’s reasons for rejection and/or their decision to withdraw the application. This could come in the form of litigation against the FDA.

    Bill Godshall
    Executive Director
    Smokefree Pennsylvania
    1926 Monongahela Avenue
    Pittsburgh, PA 15218
    412-351-5880
    smokefree@compuserve.com

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