New design, new name, same blog

Things look a bit different now if you’re visiting this site directly. If you’re reading in an RSS reader, click over to see the new design. I’ve given the site a long overdue WordPress update and created a new layout with the popular Thesis theme. My goal was to keep what was good about the old site while fixing a few bugs and making it a little less cluttered. There’s no getting around this being a text-heavy blog, but it should be a little more user-friendly now.

I’ve also eliminated the eponymous title, renaming the site “Liquidity Preference.” Those of you who paid attention in your macroeconomics classes will recognize the term from Keynes’ explanation of interest rates. Here it’s also a fitting pun on my own preference for liquid enjoyments.

I still have a few things to add to the site, such as an updated blogroll and navigation menu, but it’s basically finished. Let me know what you think.

Just for fun, here’s a look back at the three previous iterations of the blog. It started out in 2003 before I even knew what a blog was, manually updated in Microsoft FrontPage. Then my friend Adam saved me a whole lot of time by installing MovableType, bringing on the dreaded yellow banner years. A couple years later I switched to WordPress and the relative of the current design.

The one thing hasn’t changed is this site’s Guide to Good Blogging, which I’ll continue doing my best to adhere to:

Rule #1: Be meaningful.

Rule #2: If meaning is elusive, be amusing.

Rule #3: If meaning and amusement are both out of reach, be brief.

Comments

  1. RD says:

    I fear change.

  2. You libertarians really love the Thesis theme. Will Wilkinson, Tom Palmer, Overlawyered and now you. I’m boycotting the next one.

  3. Jacob Grier says:

    @Robert S. Porter: I know, I know, it’s overused. But it’s so damn functional!

  4. Barzelay says:

    It turned out very well. I certainly prefer the 3-column design to the 4-column version I previously saw.

  5. Jacob Grier says:

    @Barzelay: Thanks. The version you saw wasn’t 4-column, it just had the content on the left and the two sidebars next to each other on the right. Even I’m not crazy enough to try four columns.

    I almost went with that design until negative feedback from you and others convinced me to keep content in the center.

  6. James says:

    nice one Jacob; love the fontsize , and I am assuming there is an elusive but amusing play on ‘liquidity’ in the new title

  7. Maureen Ogle says:

    I like it! Almost wish I hadn’t seen it: I’m just about to launch my new redesign and had decided on two columns. Now I’m dithering: three columns? Or two? Three? Two?

    Anyway, the new site is terrific: crisp and clean. Love the font (which is one of the two I’m trying to decide on.)

  8. Mike says:

    I dig.

  9. Matt says:

    I like the new design, but I’m having trouble getting the page to load seamlessly. I keep getting caught up when I come to your page (bringing up the task manager seems to do the trick every time). Anything change that might be causing that? I’m using an older computer right now… but I’m not having problems with other pages…

  10. sabrina says:

    Nice.

  11. @Jacob Grier: But seriously it looks good. Though it needs more Fox Terrier.

  12. Jacob Grier says:

    @Maureen Ogle: If you have a 2-column theme you like, I say go with it. The only reason I use 3 is because I need space for the morning links. If not for them, I’d almost certainly go for a less cluttered 2-column layout. I’m happy yo look at the designs too if you want.

    @Matt: That’s not good. Hopefully it’s just the Comedy Central video a few posts below, which I’ve noticed loads slowly sometimes. Let me know if it continues to be a problem.

  13. Doug Winship says:

    I like your three rules for good blogging. Of course, I’m afraid I kinda reverse rule number three…..

  14. Jacob Grier says:

    @Doug Winship: “If all else fails, lock RumDood in the basement” makes a good rule #4.

  15. I think the new in-thing for Thesis blogs is to make them look as unThesislike as you possibly can. At least, that’s what I went for anyway.

  16. Jacob Grier says:

    I’d say you succeeded. It wasn’t until I started using Thesis and noticed the little details that I realized you were using it.

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